Writing Medical Mysteries: The Rules by @LinWilder #amwriting #writing #WriterWednesday


medical graphic
Photo credit: Big Stock Photos

 

 

When we start writing fiction, whether writing medical mysteries, romance, erotica or any of the rapidly increasing list of fictional genres, we expect a set of rules. After all, we’ve been taught to follow the rules ever since we were preschoolers.  That’s a good thing. Because all writers need to adhere to the basics of grammar, coherence, clarity. And for writers of medical mysteries, intrigue, surprise and suspense are paramount.

 

But in the now ten years that I have been writing fiction, the way I conceive of rules has changed. I think there are a set of rules which work for beginning novelists. But not too long afterward those rules must be unlearned. And last, there is a regimen, a critical routine which must be followed, even for the very experienced. Hence, we can approach the of writing medical mysteries in three phases.

 

Rules for the Novice Writer

 

By far, the primary maxim for someone who has decided she wants to write a medical mystery is to be clear about why. “I’ve always been told I write well.” Or, “Writing a novel is on my bucket list.” Or, “I think I’d like to be a writer,” won’t cut it.

 

  • Consider what your real goal is. Money? Fame? Recognition? Become another Gillian Flynn (author of Gone Girl, the book and the movie, Paula Hawkins, author of Girl on the Train, the book and movie) or Andy Weir (self-published author of The Martian, the book and the movie?) Be brutally honest here. And if these are the reasons, think again about why you want to engage in what one publisher has called The 10 Awful Truths About Book Publishing.

 

  • Lest you think that the former is meant to deter you from your dream, quite the contrary. My reasons for suggesting that you journey deep inside before you begin are from personal experience and are said to mitigate disappointment once you are finished. When the book is done and the awards do or do not trickle in, our feelings are generally a mixture of relief, pride in the accomplishment mixed with a bit of sorrow: “What do I do now?” “What’s the next act?” Simply said, the best part of any huge undertaking is the journey: the process, the challenge, learning, the highs and yes, the lows. It’s never the kudos, awards or the recognition, no matter how trivial or huge.

 

  • Make sure you like your story and your characters. You’ll be living with them in your head and on your computer for a long time. Although it is possible to get a book written and published in thirty days or less, I would not recommend following the directions of someone who promises this. The chaos in the formerly bounded book publishing business has attracted all kinds of people, some of whom you would not want to have dinner -or even a drink with. If the claim sounds impossible, it most likely is.

 

  • Write about what you know. I spent more than the first half of my life in academic medicine. I grew up with interns, residents, and all the associated paraphernalia of the teaching hospital. For me, then, writing a medical mystery was a natural. Although expertise in your chosen subject matter is not essential- it is fiction, after all, our readers can tell when we write from our own experience. It makes itself evident and therefore far more believable.

 

  • This is your story. Although your editor may be excellent in the technique of writing, you are the artist. You see the characters, hear their voices and know them…they become part of you. Of course, you would not consider publishing your book without hiring an editor, the boundaries between him and you must be distinct. If not, you risk losing essential components of your story.

 

There are far more tips than there is room here so if you will forgive the self-promotion, here are five more tips that may be useful to those of you considering writing your first novel.

 

Now That You Have Learned Them, Dump All the Rules

 

“John, I know you were a Marine, therefore you love rules. The rule you need to remember here is that there are no rules.”

My husband is a psychologist and told me about this simple piece of advice from the head nurse of an inpatient psychiatric unit where he was working as an intern. That nurse’s statement informed the more than twenty-five years that John worked as a psychologist with combat veterans. With many of his clients, particularly the suicidal ones, breaking the established rules was axiomatic in helping these men get their lives back.

Writing is exactly like that. The most important rule for a writer is to know-and believe- that there are no rules. One of my favorite quotes on this subject is attributed to Somerset Maugham. “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.”

 

However, there are a few myths or rules about writing which live on despite their falsity. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Excellent novelists are miserable, unhappy neurotics, on a good day.  One of the numerous reasons that I stuck with writing non-fiction for so much of my life is that I bought into this myth completely. The writers I loved as a young English major were either alcoholics, suicidal or psychotic. Think F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and Ezra Pound. The cost of writing my novel would be too great. And then the dream slid to the back burner as the responsibilities of life accelerated.

 

My first book was arduous. Mainly because I believed that it would only be good if writing it was, an endurance test. Therefore, I made it so. Like any work worth doing, writing a first novel is worth doing poorly. My first novel was replete with problems which were corrected in the second edition.

 

But the subsequent four books have been a totally different experience. Certainly, hard work but not arduous. At times, fun. True because of the joy of getting—really describing a new character is such a high. Like an extremely challenging character so because he is totally out of your frame of reference. Like an assassin who became my favorite character in my third and fourth books.

 

  • To complete a book, you must schedule times and a place for writing it. And consistently adhere to that schedule. I don’t have a writing schedule. Nor do I have a specific place to write. Certainly, when I am approaching a deadline, like now, my writing schedule might be most of my waking hours or as much of them as I can devote to it. But other things interrupt-husbands, kids, holidays, life. As they should.

 

Perhaps because I’ve worked for myself for over fifteen years, the challenge of working from home is a norm for me. And grabbing a few hours here and there to write doesn’t drive me crazy. Anymore.

 

  • Beware of writer’s block. There is no such thing as writer’s block. Rather I think it’s fear. The assassin I mentioned earlier is a great example. Because I found this brand-new character intimidating, I was afraid of him. And knew I needed to take time, a lot more time than I normally do. And wrote him differently. I kept going back to read and re-read sentences and paragraphs sometimes taking days or a couple of weeks off before returning. Until finally, he had flesh and muscle. I could see him, even understand, how he got there: A killer for hire.

                   

                       Essential Regimen for All Writers, Novice or Experienced

 

  • When Not Writing, Read. Assuming we want each book to be better than the last, then we must read other writers interpretation of characters and story lines. Read better writers than you are. Why? Because that is how we learn- it is how they learned.

 

  • When not writing your novel, write anyway. I do a weekly blog and have for years because I enjoy writing non-fiction. If you don’t want the tedium of writing a blog, then use a journal or diary. Writing is no different from any other discipline. The more we do it, the better we get.

 

  • Exercise. There is no better antidote to a character who has you in a corner than going for a run. Or to the gym. Or a hike in the mountains. We writers are a sedentary lot, the body part we work the hardest is our brain. Once the sweat begins to pour down your face, it is remarkable how easily we can solve a plot problem or dismiss a poor review. Or decide to walk away for a day or a week.

 

  • Eat Reasonably Healthy Meals. Although junk food is tempting and yes, okay at times, if all we are feeding those remarkably efficient brain cells are carbs and sugar, our stories will suffer. None of us can create excellence without respecting and caring for our bodies.

 

  • Get 8 hours Sleep at Minimum. Insomnia is one of the most common health problems in the US. Costing billions annually in illness, accidents and accidents, good writers cannot afford to be sleep deprived.

 

 

apriceforgenius-cover-300ppi

 

Title: A Price for Genius

Author: Lin Wilder

Genre: Medical Thriller

 

Book Blurb:

Dr. Lindsey McCall’s worst fears are realized. Not only have both drugs been stolen but two women have been kidnapped- one maybe dead. Lindsey had known Liisa Reardon’s new drug was alchemy, only this time, the end product actually more precious than gold.

 

The desperate call from Hank Reardon in Switzerland came late at night causing too many questions. And no answers. Could Lindsey and Rich Jansen uncover who was behind the crimes? It was an inside job-could they figure out who had sold out the Reardons? All in time to save Reardon’s daughter and her chief tech Ariana? Were they risking their lives as well?

 

The evil words smolder in her mind, the contents of the letter delivered to Hank Reardon

 

Hello Mr. Reardon,

By the time you get this letter, it will be too late. We’ll already have her.

Here are the steps you must not take:

  • Do not call the cops.
  • Do not contact the FBI
  • Tell no one.
  • We’ll know if you or the FBI. We’ll and we’ll kill her instantly.

You must know Sir, there is a price for genius. We trust you will pay it if you want to see your daughter alive.

 

Buy Links:

Amazon US https://www.amazon.com/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

Amazon CA https://www.amazon.ca/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

Amazon UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

 

Lin Wilder

 

Author Biography:

Lin Weeks Wilder has published dozens of articles, wrote a textbook, and has written four self-help books. Lin has written three medical thrillers situated in Houston, Texas where Lin worked for over 23 years.

 

The Fragrance Shed by a Violet, the sequel Do You Solemnly Swear? and the third in her series, A Price for Genius. The story of the return to faith, Finding the Narrow Road was an unplanned surprise. In her free time, Lin Wilder enjoys hiking, listening to beautiful music, gardening and last but certainly not least, reading. Lin is married to a former Marine and psychologist with 25 years of experience counseling ex- combat veterans. They reside in Nevada with their two dogs.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lincwilder?ref=hl

Twitter https://twitter.com/LinWilder

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/linwilder

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/linwilder

About Me https://about.me/lin.wilder

Amazon Author Page http://www.amazon.com/Dr.-Lin-Wilder/e/B007L380OM

 

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A Price for Genius by @LinWilder is a Gripping, Addictive Read! #bookreview #TuesdayBookBlog


apriceforgenius-cover-300ppi

 

Title: A Price for Genius

Author: Lin Wilder

Genre: Medical Thriller

 

Book Blurb:

Dr. Lindsey McCall’s worst fears are realized. Not only have both drugs been stolen but two women have been kidnapped- one maybe dead. Lindsey had known Liisa Reardon’s new drug was alchemy, only this time, the end product actually more precious than gold.

 

The desperate call from Hank Reardon in Switzerland came late at night causing too many questions. And no answers. Could Lindsey and Rich Jansen uncover who was behind the crimes? It was an inside job-could they figure out who had sold out the Reardons? All in time to save Reardon’s daughter and her chief tech Ariana? Were they risking their lives as well?

 

The evil words smolder in her mind, the contents of the letter delivered to Hank Reardon

 

Hello Mr. Reardon,

By the time you get this letter, it will be too late. We’ll already have her.

Here are the steps you must not take:

  • Do not call the cops.
  • Do not contact the FBI
  • Tell no one.
  • We’ll know if you or the FBI. We’ll and we’ll kill her instantly.

You must know Sir, there is a price for genius. We trust you will pay it if you want to see your daughter alive.

 

My Review:

Take one drug promising to lengthen a person’s life to 140 + one German pharmaceutical company desperate to do anything to get their hands on the drug = an adrenaline-rushing medical thriller.

 

In the middle of the night, Dr. Lindsay and her husband, Rich, receive a phone call from their friend, Hank. His daughter and another female scientist have been kidnapped and their anti-aging drug is gone. The kidnappers throw them all into a deadly (and very real) cat-and-mouse game. Can Lindsay and Rich save the women in time or have they just walked into a fatal trap?

 

WOW! Yes, that’s my first reaction to A Price for Genius. Wilder kicks up the pulse-pounding action in her third book in her medical mystery series. I couldn’t put it down and white-knuckled my e-reader the whole time. In the vein of Grisham and Coban, Wilder grabs ahold of the reader and doesn’t let go. Wilder likes to plunge the reader into the action and I advise you to take deep breaths while reading. I worried for several of the characters and the bad guys were deliciously evil. Thrilling, addictive and reads like a movie, you’ll never guess the ending. Can’t wait for the next book in the series.

 

Favorite Character/Quote:

“You must know Sir, there is a price for genius.”

 

My Rating:  5 stars

 

Buy it now:

Amazon US https://www.amazon.com/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

Amazon CA https://www.amazon.ca/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

Amazon UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Price-Genius-Lin-Wilder-ebook/dp/B01MG5JLBI

 

Lin Wilder

 

Author Biography:

Lin Weeks Wilder has published dozens of articles, wrote a textbook, and has written four self-help books. Lin has written three medical thrillers situated in Houston, Texas where Lin worked for over 23 years.

 

The Fragrance Shed by a Violet, the sequel Do You Solemnly Swear? and the third in her series, A Price for Genius. The story of the return to faith, Finding the Narrow Road was an unplanned surprise. In her free time, Lin Wilder enjoys hiking, listening to beautiful music, gardening and last but certainly not least, reading. Lin is married to a former Marine and psychologist with 25 years of experience counseling ex- combat veterans. They reside in Nevada with their two dogs.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lincwilder?ref=hl

Twitter https://twitter.com/LinWilder

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/linwilder

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/linwilder

About Me https://about.me/lin.wilder

Amazon Author Page http://www.amazon.com/Dr.-Lin-Wilder/e/B007L380OM

 

Reviewed by: Mrs. N

The Fragrance Shed By A Violet by @LinWilder #bookreview #medicalmystery #TuesdayBookBlog


Fragrance Shed by a Violet

 

Title: The Fragrance Shed By A Violet: Murder in the Medical Center 2nd edition

Author: Lin Wilder

Genre: Medical Mystery

 

Book Blurb:

Why did a Houston district attorney decide to involve the state in an area of the law that it has historically treated as sacrosanct: that of medical decision-making? Why did the DA decide to charge McCall with murder rather than criminal negligence in a civil court? Author Lin Weeks Wilder continues Dr. Lindsey McCall’s story in the new book, “The Fragrance Shed By A Violet Cover: Murder in The Medical Center”.

In a city where the Texas Medical Center reigns as one of the top employers in Houston, housing over three thousand medical researchers making the news with new pharmaceutical discoveries almost daily, why did twelve Houstonians unanimously decide to convict Dr. McCall for intentional murder following her trial?”

These are the questions that lead investigative reporter Kate Townsend to write a Pulitzer Prize winning series called Murder in the Texas Medical Center. Haunted by the knowledge that her new-found fame has been purchased at too high a price; Kate is sure that McCall is not guilty.

Texas Governor Greg Bell hires former homicide detective and criminal defense attorney Rich Jansen to fix the escalating problems at the Huntsville Prisons recently inflamed by a lawsuit against infamous inmate Dr. Lindsey McCall. Dr. McCall is an internationally acclaimed cardiologist, researcher, and a 2002 nominee for the Nobel Prize for Medicine. When Jansen’s skills quickly result in the resignation of an incompetent prison medical director, he realizes that this strange saga is just beginning.

Mark Twain wrote that forgiveness was the fragrance shed by a violet upon the heel of the boot that has crushed it. This medical mystery weaves together the lives of two sisters, Lindsey, and Paula, with those of strangers as each cope with loss, betrayal, jealousy, and the exquisitely painful journey to forgiveness.

 

My Review:

I’m a recent fan of medical mysteries, even though it’s been a popular genre for years. In The Fragrance Shed by a Violet, Lin Wilder takes us deep inside medical research and one doctor’s actions that reverberates throughout the community. Dr. Lindsay McCall is tried and convicted for intentional murder. As she sits in jail, guilt and shame her companions in the cell, investigative reporter Kate Townsend is confident Dr. McCall didn’t do it. She investigates and what she uncovers, shakes the medical industry to the core. Can she free Dr. McCall or will greater forces keep her quiet?

 

But there’s a deeper storyline here, one that surprised me. Forgiveness. Do we have the capacity to forgive ourselves as we forgive others? Whether it’s admitting a costly error in judgement or betraying a loved one, forgiveness is one of life’s ultimate challenges. Dr. McCall must forgive herself but at what cost?

 

This is more than a simple medical mystery. I’d also include courtroom drama as well as investigative thriller to the genre. Filled with subtle sub-plots and twists I wasn’t expecting, The Fragrance Shed by a Violet is one of the best books I’ve read this year. I loved Dr. McCall as a main character for many reasons but one that sticks out is authentic. Every emotion she experiences, the reader does as well, and that makes for a gripping story. Wilder is a gifted writer, whose knowledge of the medical industry is apparent from the first page. Intricately-woven, she takes the reader deep into the characters and circumstances so the reader is left wondering what he/she would do if that happened to them.

 

If I had to sum my feelings in four words, I’d say this book is gripping, honest and unexpectedly touching. Highly recommend!

 

Favorite Character/Quote:

“She almost laughed out loud in the dark at herself—at least the terror of this dream was familiar and lay buried in her past; her real nightmare was no dream, no mere memory. And she could feel the fear uncoil, stretch, and begin to take her over once again. Closing her eyes, she began to pray:

 

Let nothing dismay thee.

All things pass.

God never changes.

Patience acquires all that is strived for.

She who has God finds that she lacks nothing.

God alone suffices.”

 

My Rating:  5+ stars

 

Buy it now:

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Fragrance-Shed-Violet-Murder-Medical/dp/1942545177/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1477058516&sr=8-3&keywords=lin+wilder

 

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-fragrance-shed-by-a-violet-lin-wilder/1122746192?ean=9781942545170

 

Google Play https://books.google.com/books?id=XCnGCgAAQBAJ&pg=PP4&lpg=PP4&dq=lin+wilder+books&source=bl&ots=47iaR5C0Ng&sig=TOk3ay_grsz5gbk3_Y_Uc5EpjYU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiTltayiOzPAhXIy1QKHU15CIM4FBDoAQgwMAA

 

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27181645-the-fragrance-shed-by-a-violet

 

Lin Wilder

 

Author Biography:

Lin Weeks Wilder has published dozens of articles, wrote a textbook, and has written four self-help books. Lin has written three medical thrillers situated in Houston, Texas where Lin worked for over 23 years—The Fragrance Shed by a Violet, the sequel Do You Solemnly Swear? and the third in her series, A Price for Genius. The story of the return to faith, Finding the Narrow Road was an unplanned surprise.

 

In her free time, Lin Wilder enjoys hiking, listening to beautiful music, gardening and last but certainly not least, reading. Lin is married to a former Marine and psychologist with 25 years of experience counseling ex- combat veterans. They reside in Nevada with their two dogs.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lincwilder

Twitter https://twitter.com/LinWilder

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7944373.Lin_Wilder

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/linwilder

About Me https://about.me/lin.wilder

Amazon Author Page http://www.amazon.com/Dr.-Lin-Wilder/e/B007L380OM

 

Reviewed by: Mrs. N

Meet Paula from The Fragrance Shed by a Violet by @LinWilder #medicalmystery #thriller


Fragrance Shed by a Violet

 

Today, it’s our great pleasure to bring you this exclusive interview from one of the characters from Lin Wilder’s The Fragrance Shed by a Violet. Paula Livingston, sister to Dr. Lindsey McCall, agreed to an interview conducted by MRS N and we think you’ll be surprised by her candor. Welcome, Paula. Please introduce yourself.

 

Hello, my name is Paula Livingston, the older sister of Dr. Lindsey McCall, world-famous Interventional Cardiologist and Researcher. I am a cardiac nurse, single mother of three and until very recently, the main caregiver for our desperately ill mother. Mom died because Lindsey used her non -FDA approved drug Digipro to augment Mom’s failing heart. But Mom’s heart was too damaged from long-term cardiomyopathy, Lindsey’s drug pushed it too hard.

 

 

  • What is your idea of perfect happiness?

The life I am living right this very minute. Finally, the great Lindsey McCall knows what it’s like to feel alone, frightened, and hopeless. Exactly the way I have felt most of my life. This journalist, Kate Townsend, is getting a Pulitzer Prize for the story she wrote about Lindsey. And Lindsey sits in Huntsville Prison because she murdered our mother. How perfect is that?

 

  • What is your greatest fear?

That I am an alcoholic, that I’m addicted to drugs. That I can no longer control how much I need to drink. The shaking in my hands scares me. And there have been too many instances of blackouts where I can’t remember what happened. I think they are increasing. My coordination is getting worse as well.

 

 

  • What is your current state of mind?

I am ecstatic. Lindsey’s drug Digipro works-it’s been approved by the FDA. She did it, revolutionized the treatment for heart failure but she’ll be in prison for years. But I admit I am a little worried about the reporter. I don’t think Kate Townsend likes me.

 

  • On what occasion do you lie?

I’ve been lying since I was twelve. When I began to drink. To Mom and Dad, to just about everyone, teachers, boyfriends, husband and kids. It’s an art, lying. And requires enormous creativity and memory. Because it’s critical to remember the lies, if you forget the lies, then the problems start. I never forget.

 

  • When and where were you happiest?

I was a really happy kid. We moved all over the country because Dad was in the Air Force. I never minded because making friends came so easily to me. But when I was almost eleven, Mom had Lindsey. And I had to help her with the baby. At first, it was okay, she was kind of cute but then it wasn’t. Mom was tired a lot. She probably had the cardiomyopathy long before she was diagnosed. And Mom expected more and more of my help after school. So I started lying about homework and studying with friends. I guess the lying started even before I started drinking.

 

Title: The Fragrance Shed By A Violet: Murder in the Medical Center

Author: Lin Wilder

Genre: Medical Mystery, Courtroom Thriller

Publisher: Wyatt-Makenzie Imprint

 

Book Blurb:

Why did a Houston district attorney decide to involve the state in an area of the law that it has historically treated as sacrosanct: that of medical decision-making? Why did the DA decide to charge McCall with murder rather than criminal negligence in a civil court? Author Lin Weeks Wilder continues Dr. Lindsey McCall’s story in the new book, “The Fragrance Shed By A Violet Cover: Murder in The Medical Center”.

 

In a city where the Texas Medical Center reigns as one of the top employers in Houston, housing over three thousand medical researchers making the news with new pharmaceutical discoveries almost daily, why did twelve Houstonians unanimously decide to convict Dr. McCall for intentional murder following her trial?

 

These are the questions that lead investigative reporter Kate Townsend to write a Pulitzer Prize winning series called Murder in the Texas Medical Center. Haunted by the knowledge that her new-found fame has been purchased at too high a price; Kate is sure that McCall is not guilty.
Texas Governor Greg Bell hires former homicide detective and criminal defense attorney Rich Jansen to fix the escalating problems at the Huntsville Prisons recently inflamed by a lawsuit against infamous inmate Dr. Lindsey McCall. Dr. McCall is an internationally acclaimed cardiologist, researcher, and a 2002 nominee for the Nobel Prize for Medicine. When Jansen’s skills quickly result in the resignation of an incompetent prison medical director, he realizes that this strange saga is just beginning.
Mark Twain wrote that forgiveness was the fragrance shed by a violet upon the heel of the boot that has crushed it. This medical mystery weaves together the lives of two sisters, Lindsey, and Paula, with those of strangers as each cope with loss, betrayal, jealousy, and the exquisitely painful journey to forgiveness.
Wilder’s second edition of her debut novel has it all. Mystery, romance, and dysfunctional family relationships wrapped up in a tale of big pharma and medicine. Literary Fiction Review dubbed it ‘A story fragrant with love and forgiveness’: https://literaryfictionreview.com/fragrance.php

 

Extended Excerpt:

Prologue

 

She lay listening to the unfamiliar night sounds: the pacing of other sleepless prisoners, the occasional echo of a heavy-footed guard making his rounds. Mostly though, she waited for the terror of the dream to subside, for the iron bands around her heart to loosen, and for the awful pressure on her chest to lighten so that she could breathe. And she waited for her heart to climb back down into her chest and out of her throat.

 

The dream was a familiar one. It had begun four years before following the sudden death of a fifty-two-year-old man whose heart she had catheterized. Dr. Lindsey McCall had surgical hands—a reference to the skill and dexterity that she brought to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at the University of Houston General Hospital. A colleague had made the comment during rounds one day during her cardiology fellowship at Houston General, and it had stuck.

 

There had been no reason for his death. Nate Morrison was a healthy senior executive with Southwest Oil, one of the largest oil conglomerates in the world. During his annual physical, Morrison had been referred to Houston General for a work up based on nonspecific changes in his cardiac diagnostic tests.

 

Upon reviewing his tests, Lindsey had suspected that the man’s coronaries might be clean—free of coronary artery disease. She was well aware of the numbers. Of the sixty thousand cardiac catheterizations performed each year in the United States, over 30 percent revealed clean coronaries: absence of plaque in the vessels supplying the heart with oxygenated blood. And the procedure was not benign. Complications of cardiac catheterization were not uncommon and ranged from mild hematoma to death. In twelve years, Lindsey had done over five hundred cardiac catheterizations and over three hundred angioplasties. She had never lost a patient.

 

But close to 75 percent of the revenue of her department was due to referrals from doctors practicing in Texas and the Houston metropolitan area; the physicians at Southwest Oil referred hundreds of patients to Houston General per year, usually for an angioplasty or cardiac cath. Furthermore, McCall was well acquainted with the financial realities of her profession—turning down lucrative procedures like cardiac catheterizations was not smart.

 

For some reason she could no longer recall, she, rather than one of the cath lab nurses, had gone to see this man the night before the procedure. While she had been reviewing the potential complications with her patient and obtaining his informed consent, Morrison had asked with a wink, “Just how many patients have you lost in your twelve-year career, Dr. McCall?”

 

His quick-grinned response to her answer had been, “Well then, let’s you and I make sure that I’m not the first, deal?”

 

Lindsey could picture that conversation as if it had happened a moment ago. Fourteen hours later, he was dead.

 

As she had done hundreds of times before upon awakening from the dream, Lindsey lay there second-guessing herself— asking all the questions that had been asked by his family, by the morbidity and mortality committee at the hospital, and by her chairman of medicine. The final diagnosis had been sudden death due to a massive left ventricular infarct most likely from coronary spasm. Neither his family nor the hospital held her responsible. There had never been even the suggestion of negligence on her part.

 

Her technique had been flawless. She had been calm and confident throughout the two-hour procedure, explaining what she was doing to her patient and laughing at his quick-witted responses. Lindsey had completed the injection of dye into the man’s left anterior coronary artery, and after satisfying herself that it, too, was free of plaque and had almost completely extracted the catheter from his coronary in preparation to end the procedure was when she heard the startled cry of her technician.

 

“Lindsey, he’s fibrillating, he’s fibrillating!”

 

For just a second, her gaze met that of her lead tech, Ben, who responded to her unspoken question. “He’s been in sinus rhythm for the whole exam—there was never any arrhythmia, not even a PVC!”

 

Ben was referring to premature ventricular contractions that are frequently harbingers of serious cardiac arrhythmias. Lindsey trusted this guy implicitly; they had worked together for over ten years. If Ben said there had been no warning of this potentially fatal arrhythmia, she believed him. So she and her staff went to work, certain that in just a few minutes, they would get control and be back to the routine work of winding down the procedure.

 

But they couldn’t.

 

They had worked for over three hours, along with six members of the hospital’s on-call code team who had responded to the emergency in the Cath lab. They were never able to restore a normal cardiac rhythm, despite massive amounts of antiarrhythmic and other emergency drugs along with numerous attempts at electrical defibrillation.

 

That was the last time she had accepted a patient for catheterization.

 

The chairman of Medicine at Houston General had spent hours with Lindsey over that first year following the death of this patient trying, in futile attempts, to help her forgive herself. He had known her since she had been accepted into the cardiology fellowship almost fifteen years earlier and had followed the young woman’s career at first with interest and later with excitement.

 

Dr. Simon Bayer was known to many as the cardiologists’ cardiologist. He too had been excellent in diagnostics, research, and in education. Author of several textbooks and principal investigator of countless experimental drug protocols, Dr. Bayer was internationally admired and respected. But in close to forty years as chairman of Internal Medicine at Houston General, Dr. Bayer had never before seen the talent exhibited by this young physician.

 

Early in her fellowship, Lindsey had talked with Dr. Bayer about her preliminary doctoral work with alteration of the molecule for digitalis. At that time, he had listened politely. Lindsey remembered sensing that her chairman believed she was chasing windmills—the drug had been around forever after all.

 

For centuries, physicians have treated heart failure with digitalis. Its effect on strengthening a failing left ventricle—the main pump of the four-chambered heart—remains unparalleled. But the drug has serious systemic side effects ranging from mild to potentially fatal depending on dosage and frequency. Lindsey had become interested in the drug in high school when her mother had been diagnosed with idiopathic cardiomyopathy— heart failure of unknown origin—at the age of forty-three.

 

Cardiomyopathies are a strange and almost-universally-fatal type of heart failure. Thought to be caused by a virus, the actual mechanism of disease is poorly understood. But the course of the disease is all too well known: increasing heart failure and incapacitation over time and death if not treated with heart transplantation. Despite living fifty miles from the premiere transplant center if the world, the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Lindsey’s mother would not consider transplantation. That she lived for close to thirty years without surgical intervention was considered a minor miracle by her physicians. Then, as now, digitalis was the drug of choice for heart failure, and so the balancing act of dosaging began—sufficient medication to keep the heart out of failure but not so much as to cause severe nausea and vomiting and toxicity to the heart.

 

Before her illness, Lindsey’s mom had been physically active with many outside interests and lots of friends. Although she had never worked outside her home, she had been active in volunteer and church work. The disease completely changed her personality; Ann became incapable of focusing on much other than her symptoms and the acute anxiety brought about by the facts of her disease and incapacitation.

 

Only thirteen at the time, Lindsey handled the virtual loss of her mother through intense study: of the heart, of her mother’s disease, and of the drugs that manage heart failure, specifically digitalis. This intellectual response to loss, crisis, and fear worked exceedingly well for the young girl and would become her major response to trauma throughout her life.

 

At the age of seven, Lindsey had decided that she would be a cardiologist and a research scientist; the acute onset of Ann McCall’s illness served to augment and crystallize Lindsey’s ambition. Throughout her junior and senior high school years, the young girl persuaded her chemistry and biology teachers to support her determination to alter the digitalis molecule in ways that would optimize its inotropic or strengthening effects on the heart, while mitigating its toxic effects.

 

Recognizing and respecting his daughter’s ambition, Tom McCall, Lindsey’s father, a NASA test pilot, made certain that Lindsey received the best of what the Clear Lake Texas schools offered in their advanced science courses. Therefore, Lindsey received quality tutors throughout the six years of junior and senior high school. Lindsey McCall’s cardiac models were entered at each science fair and, without fail, received first prize.

 

Buy Links: 

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Fragrance-Shed-Violet-Murder-Medical-ebook/dp/B016SNAW28

 

Barnes and Noble  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-fragrance-shed-by-a-violet-lin-wilder/1122746192;jsessionid=E052F2F1621F01918CBAF1085613B3BD.prodny_store01-atgap08?ean=9781942545255

Google Play https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=mSjDCgAAQBAJ&source=productsearch&utm_source=HA_Desktop_US&utm_medium=SEM&utm_campaign=PLA&pcampaignid=MKTAD0930BO1&gclid=CMi30_Pvs9ICFYa7fgodT5gKuQ&gclsrc=ds

Walmart https://www.walmart.com/ip/The-Fragrance-Shed-by-a-Violet-Murder-in-the-Medical-Center/53643655?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227043587008&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=87165015769&wl4=aud-273067695102:pla-193654223089&wl5=9031747&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=53643655&wl13=&veh=sem

 

Lin Wilder

 

Author Biography:

Lin Wilder holds a Doctorate in Public Health and has published extensively in fields like cardiac physiology, institutional ethics, and hospital management. In 2005, she switched from non-fiction to fiction. Her series of medical thrillers are situated in Houston, Texas with many references to the Texas Medical Center where Lin worked for over twenty-three years. Her latest book is A Price for Genius. All her books are available at Amazon.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lincwilder?ref=hl

Twitter https://twitter.com/LinWilder

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7944373.Lin_Wilder

Amazon Author Page https://www.amazon.com/Dr.-Lin-Wilder/e/B007L380OM

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/linwilder

About Me https://about.me/lin.wilder

Stillness by Eldon Farrell Will Appeal to #RobinCook Readers! #bookreview #medicalthriller #books


stillness

 

Title: Stillness

Author: Eldon Farrell

Genre: Medical Mystery / Thriller

 

Book Blurb:

Some secrets won’t stay buried…

 

When people start to succumb to a virulent strain of plague in the seemingly idyllic hamlet of Stillness, the CDC is called in to investigate. Pulled from her training with the Epidemic Intelligence Service, Dr. Lynne Bosworth is tapped to head the investigation.

 

Many questions surround the outbreak, not the least of which is how did plague find its way to the heartland of America? Determined to find the answers and her own way out of the long shadow cast by her father, Lynne embarks for Iowa. Unable to isolate an index case of bubonic plague, patient zero is traced to Nikolai Markov; an old Russian bio warfare scientist.

 

Rumors of a bioterror attack are rampant.

 

Under examination, the bacteria present Lynne with many anomalies but few answers. The antibiotic resistance noted in the field is absent in the lab, while a synthetic gene is found that seemingly has no purpose. For her superiors it’s enough to deem the outbreak a biological attack, a conclusion that Lynne does not share. For her, something about the whole incident remains…elusive.

 

In search of evidence to either prove or disprove the bioterror claim, she crosses paths with FBI Special Agent Caleb Fine. Together, they come to believe that something other than a biological attack is going on in Stillness, and that the answer to what may lie in solving the fifteen-year-old murders of Bobby and Maggie Sullivan.

 

As the body count rises and the pressure mounts, they delve deeper into the shadowy past of this quiet town; in the process exposing secrets long thought forgotten until finally uncovering the shocking truth behind the cause of the outbreak.

 

 

My Review:

The resident of Stillness, a small town in America’s Heartland, are under attack and no one is immune to this virus. The CDC is called in to investigate, led by Dr. Lynne Bosworth. While the CDC assumes it is a biological attack, Lynne thinks otherwise. Teamed up with FBI Agent Caleb Fine, she’s determined to get to the bottom of this mysterious outbreak. As the body counts rise, she knows she’s running out of time. Will she discover the culprit even if it means exposes long buried secrets and ruining her career or will she toe the CDC political line?

 

I’m a big fan of medical thrillers and Stillness kept me guessing until the very end. Filled with intriguing characters and multiple story lines, Stillness read like a HBO television series. Descriptive, well-researched medical backdrop reminded me of Robin Cook while the heart-stopping plot twists reminded me of Michael Crichton. Some of the transitions were abrupt and I got lost a few times so I had to drop it from five stars to four.  I couldn’t put it down and the subject matter is relevant in today’s scientific and political society. Well done, Farrell. I look forward to reading the next book in the series.

 

Disclaimer: I received a copy from the author in the hopes I’s review it.

 

Favorite Character: I found I could relate with Dr. Lynne the greatest and while she dealt with a huge amount in a short time, it was believable. Emotional angst is high but that seemed to solidify my connection with her. Strong-willed, logical and brave, she’s my kind of thriller heroine.

 

Favorite Quote: The world never really ends, no matter how dark it gets, the light of humanity never goes out. It will always chase away the darkness that is forever there inside each of us.

 

My Rating:  4 stars

 

Buy it now:

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Stillness-Eldon-Farrell/dp/1533404526

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30301910-stillness

 

Author Biography:

Eldon Farrell was born in Guelph, Ontario, growing up just down the road in Brantford. A designated professional accountant, he’s a graduate of both Fanshawe College and Laurentian University. He still resides in South Western Ontario together with his lovely wife Emily and their young son Connor. An avid reader and writer of suspense fiction, he is a lover of language and an unapologetic fan of DC Comics. Stillness is his first published piece of fiction.

 

Social Media Links:

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15147838.Eldon_Farrell

Amazon Author Page https://www.amazon.com/Eldon-Farrell/e/B01DTBSLNE

 

Reviewed by: Mrs. N

Get to Know Author @LinWilder and Her Upcoming Medical Mystery #POTLReads #FridayReads


Lin Wilder

We first met Lin Wilder in 2015 and after reading her gripping, Do You Solemnly Swear?, we couldn’t get enough of her writing. We’re big fans and after a few nudgings, she agreed to sit down for an author interview. So, grab your favorite beverage and enjoy! Take it away, Lin: 

 

What is your writing process?

It is not linear. Or analytical or anything like my system when I wrote non-fiction. Totally intuitive, ‘from the seat of my pants’ if you will. During the process of writing my first novel, I wasted many months in futile attempts to come with an outline. Finally, I just began to write the book. As I consider my next book, the 4th in my series, I realize that the title is a very early part of my ‘process’ as are important new characters; their names and an image of what they look like and their outstanding attributes.

Do you have any odd writing habits?

I think most of us writers are odd…therefore odd writing habits are to be expected, aren’t they?

Mine? I never have an outline, title generally appears first—at least early. And have no routine—I write when the words are there, only then. I have learned through many failed attempts to push it that if the words are not there then I will write only drivel. The entire intuitive nature of creative writing feels odd to me—even after 3 novels. And with each new novel, I have to relearn to trust this non-rational, non-system…of waiting until the words appear.

What book do you wish you could have written?

What a cool question! It’s actually a play, A Man for all Seasons by Robert Bolt.

Just as your books inspire authors, what authors have inspired you?

Since I read voraciously and have since childhood, there are many. Too many to list here. However, the writers which immediately come to mind are: Dean Koontz, Jodi Piccault, Daniel Silva, Carolyn Keane, Albert Payson Terhune, DW Buffa, Daniel Pink, Stephen Pressfield and Robert Greene.

If you could cast your characters in the Hollywood adaptation of your book, who would play your characters?

Jodi Foster as Dr. Lindsey McCall, Diane Lane would play Kate Townsend, Gerard Butler as Rich Jansen and Liam Hemsworth as Gabe McAllister. Ask me this question next year and the names would change.

How important are names to you in your books? Do you choose the names based on liking the way it sounds or the meaning?

Names are crucial. But not just the way the name sounds rather the ‘fit’ with the character- the person he or she is. I cannot write about a main character without the name. Sometimes it takes time for the name to show up. But usually they hang around for a while. Here is an example: For the book I’ll start as soon as I ‘recover’ from the just published A Price for Genius, the name Morgan Gardner had been in my mind for close to a year. I knew she was a new character for the next book. A surprise because she is 18 and I don’t write about young characters—teens but I guess that is about to change.

What do you consider to be your best accomplishment?

Not sure what you are asking here. I have had a number of careers since it’s been a long time since I’ve been called ‘young.’ In each of the careers, I worked hard-often too hard and accumulated a list of what could be called accomplishments. One of what could be called both a burden and a blessing for me is that once I understand-get something as in master it, I lose interest. Because I think there is so much to learn in our very short lifetimes. So I am going to reword your question to what is the best decision I have ever made? It is two pronged: When I became a Christian Catholic-and when I married my husband John.

Current accomplishments? Writing better books each time. This next book is better than the last one. That is always the goal.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

It’s a funny thing but I have never made 5 year goals. Ever. I concentrate on what is happening now- on what I am working on now. Even back when I had no title at all, the goal was simple. For the first few decades, it was to complete the next degree. Which took a long time—Then it was to finish this article or that chapter or the textbook. And then it was to get this or that job. Current goal—force myself to wait at least 6 weeks before starting next book.

Have you always liked to write?

Yes. But until 7 years ago it was non-fiction. The switch to fiction was a surprise- unplanned, like most of my life. And a dream I pretended I no longer wanted until suddenly there I was writing my first novel. I was shocked.

What writing advice do you have for other aspiring authors?

Write. Don’t talk about writing, write. Don’t ask others’ opinions, write. Every once in a while, read an author you know is great that you love and let yourself be intimidated, overwhelmed and convinced you can never write like him or her. Because you can’t. Don’t try. Get a good, no a great editor. Promise yourself once you begin that you will finish it.

If you didn’t like writing books, what would you do for a living?

Write plays.

Are you a plotter or a pantster?

Not sure what you mean here but am guessing that you are referring back to my reply to question #2. So think I am ‘seat of the pants’.

Do you read your reviews?

Yes of course! Each and every one! Do you respond to them, good or bad? No not usually. Do you have any advice on how to deal with the bad? Get over it!

What is your best marketing tip?

Develop an email list of interested readers. Then send compelling messages about each new book.

What is your least favorite part of the publishing / writing process?

Editing, proofing, then more editing and more proofing.

Is there one subject you would never write about as an author?

Graphic sex as in erotica or horror.

Do you have a favorite spot to write? No. What is it?

Since I use a laptop, I write anywhere and everywhere. So no favorite.

Is there a certain type of scene that’s harder for you to write than others? Love? Action? Racy?

Initially, the sexual scenes were difficult then the murder…now, who knows?

Is this your first book? How many books have you written prior (if any?)

No, this is my sixth book.

What are you working on now?

A Pale Horse- Malthus Revisited.

What is your next project?

It will be the 4th of the Lindsey McCall series.

 

Now for something more personal…

 

Do you write naked?

No.

What is your biggest failure?

Not starting to write fiction before now. Looking at this answer, I am not sure that’s true because I think my early fictional writing would not be anywhere as good as it is now.

What is the biggest fib you’ve ever told?

That Hemmingway was my favorite author before I had read any of his books, or any authors of literary quality for that matter.

Have you ever been in trouble with the law?

No.

Have you ever gotten into a fight?

Verbally, plenty of times. No, not a physical fight.

Characters often find themselves in situations they aren’t sure they can get themselves out of. When was the last time you found yourself in a situation that was hard to get out of and what did you do?

I have an absurdly awful sense of direction. My husband and I were in Rome on vacation and we went totally different directions in a weirdly configured museum. I walked in circles for over an hour looking for him. Finally, he found and increasingly desperate me.

Do you drink? Smoke? What’s your vice?

Don’t smoke yes I drink but not to the point that it’s a problem. Biggest vice? Pride, vanity selfishness-the usual banal list.

What is your biggest fear?

Not fully using each of my gifts. Being lazy, wasting time.

What do you want your tombstone to say?

Don’t care what it says. Figure by then I have done all that I can do so what is written there does not matter.

If you had a superpower, what would it be?

Converse with animals- all of them, really understanding one another, the way it must have been in Eden.

If you were a super hero, what would your name be? What costume would you wear?

Wonder Woman- her costume would be fine.

What literary character is most like you?

Both Kate Townsend and Lindsey McCall have similar qualities.

 

What secret talents do you have?

Anything I do well is public knowledge. It’s the stuff I do poorly that I keep to myself.

Where is one place you want to visit that you haven’t been before?

Israel. I would like to see where Christ lived.

If you were an animal, what would you be and why?

Humpback whale. I think they have sacred knowledge.

What’s on your bucket list (things to do before you die)?

Don’t have a bucket list.  Am not a list maker. Probably should be but am not.

If you could have any name in the world, what would you choose?

Probably Lindsey.

Do you have any scars? What are they from?

On my knees from road rash.

What were you like as a child? Your favorite toy?

Withdrawn loner. My blue stuffed dog with an unimaginative name: Blue Dog

What do you dream? Do you have any recurring dreams/nightmares?

Yes, trying to escape humungous tidal waves.

 

apriceforgenius-cover-300ppi

 

Title: A Price for Genius

Author: Lin Wilder

Genre: Medical Mystery

Publisher: Wyatt Mackenzie Imprint

 

Book Blurb:

Dr. Lindsey McCall’s worst fears are realized. Not only have both drugs been stolen but two women have been kidnapped- one maybe dead. Lindsey had known Liisa Reardon’s new drug was alchemy, only this time, the end product actually more precious than gold.

The desperate call from Hank Reardon in Switzerland came late at night causing too many questions. And no answers. Could Lindsey and Rich Jansen uncover who was behind the crimes? It was an inside job-could they figure out who had sold out the Reardons? All in time to save Reardon’s daughter and her chief tech Ariana? Were they risking their lives as well?

The evil words smolder in her mind, the contents of the letter delivered to Hank Reardon

Hello Mr. Reardon,

By the time you get this letter, it will be too late. We’ll already have her.

Here are the steps you must not take:

  • Do not call the cops.
  • Do not contact the FBI
  • Tell no one.
  • We’ll know if you or the FBI. We’ll and we’ll kill her instantly.

You must know Sir, there is a price for genius. We trust you will pay it if you want to see your daughter alive.

 

Excerpt:

PROLOGUE

 Lausanne, Switzerland

Suddenly regaining consciousness, Rich Jansen attempted to stand, then instantly regretted the movement. The pain began at the base of his head and exploded in successive and increasingly intense waves of agony, forcing him to close his eyes, hang his head and wait motionless. Remaining on his hands and knees for a minute then two for the pain to subside, for the nausea to fade, Jansen risked opening his eyes. Squinting at the bright light, he very slowly and carefully moved his head from right to left.

So far so good. Linoleum floor, shiny black and white. That noise what is that sound? Aw no, don’t tell me, please God…

The memories flooded back as Rich raised himself up enough to crouch, knowing better than to immediately stand up. Gingerly reaching behind his head with his right hand, he winced when his fingers probed a large wet and sore swelling at the back of his head. Slowly he stood, swaying a bit while the vast room spun about him.

Whatever they hit me with carried a hell of a wallop.

The phone call from Reardon had happened last night? Or was it yesterday? The minute he hung up the phone, Rich had called the airport to secure a seat on the next flight to Zurich. Sixteen hours later, he had arrived at the animal research labs in the corporate offices of Andrews, Sacks, and Levine, one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, located in Lausanne Switzerland.

The elfin Ariana had been showing him where the test mice were kept when everything went black. Looking around for her Jansen saw only a few spots of blood and some scuff marks. He saw mice scrabbling all over the lab; for whatever reasons, whoever broke in decided to free hundreds of mice and Ariana was nowhere to be seen.

The letter…where is the letter?

Jansen reached into the pockets of his sports jacket, the copy of the one he’d had on since leaving San Luis Obispo, California and breathed a sigh of relief when his right hand pulled out the single page. A page now bloodied from his head wound.

Hello Mr. Reardon,

By the time you get this letter, it will be too late. We’ll already have her.

Here are the steps you must not take:

  • Do not call the cops.
  • Do not contact the FBI
  • Tell no one.

We’ll know if you contact the police or the FBI. We’ll know and we’ll kill her instantly. But we are civilized businesspeople; this is all about business after all. Do nothing at all until you hear from us. And you will hear from us, Mr. Reardon.

You must know Sir, there is a price for genius. We trust you will pay it if you want to see your daughter alive.

In the other pocket of his jacket, Jansen found his cell. He hit her number.

Please pick up, please pick up.

Heart hammering as he counted the rings, Jansen’s knees nearly buckled with relief when his wife answered her phone. “Lindsey, where are you?”

“Neither. I’m at the track, I was just starting a run with Max.” Lindsey stopped still. She could hear the tension in her husband’s voice.

“Honey, I need to you to get here as soon as you can find someone to take care of Max and get a flight out to Zurich. We’ll pick you up at the airport.”

“What’s happened Rich, what is going on?”

“ Someone clubbed me while Ari was showing me around the lab. When I woke up, Ariana was missing and hundreds of mice were running around loose. Ari and I must have surprised whoever has decided to steal Liisa’s research. Hank is…well, you can imagine how he is.” Grabbing a nearby chair to steady himself, “There’s a letter from Liisa’s kidnappers. We need you to figure out how we meet their demands, we don’t have a lot of time.”

“Are you okay?” Lindsey was on her phone searching for flights out of San Francisco to Zurich  as she waited for his answer.

Rich swayed from another wave of dizziness and nausea, gulped and replied, “Other than a mega lump on the back of my skull, yeah, I’m fine.. Whoever it was just wanted me out of commission for a few minutes. Ari and I must have interrupted whoever it was.”

Rich surveyed the disarray in the lab. Cages were overturned and he could hear the squeals of mice and the scrabbling of their feet on the tiled floor. That had been the noise he had heard when he was coming to. He was way too old for this crap and knew just who he’d call once he ended the call with his wife.

“I can get there faster from San Francisco. I’m calling Kate to make sure it would be okay to bring Max to their house. I’ll aim to be in Zurich by tomorrow at this time, will call you when I know the time I’ll get in. Be careful Rich, please.” But there was only dead air.

“Hey, McAllister, Rich Jansen here. Are you and Baron still roaming free around the country?

“Yo, Rich!” Rich could hear the smile in Gabe’s voice.

“Are you still looking to work for Zach and me?”

“You mean like as a private investigator?”

“Probably more than just investigation Gabe.”

“What do you mean?”

“Gabe, this could get dicey. Two women have been kidnapped, Reardon has a note threatening that they’ll kill his head of research at his pharmaceutical company Andrews, Sacks, and Levine if he brings in the police or the feds. She also happens to be his daughter. And I’ve been attacked within my first hour here.” Scanning the space once again, hoping that Ariana would materialize, Jansen added, “And it looks as if they grabbed the head of the animal research labs too. She was showing me around when we were suddenly assaulted. She is nowhere to be found.

 

Buy Links:

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Price-Genius-Dr-Lin-Wilder/dp/1942545681/ref=cm_wl_huc_item#productPromotions

 

Author Biography:

Lin Weeks Wilder has published dozens of articles, wrote a textbook, and has written four self-help books. Lin has written three medical thrillers situated in Houston, Texas where Lin worked for over 23 years.

The Fragrance Shed by a Violet, the sequel Do You Solemnly Swear? and the third in her series, A Price for Genius. The story of the return to faith, Finding the Narrow Road was an unplanned surprise. In her free time, Lin Wilder enjoys hiking, listening to beautiful music, gardening and last but certainly not least, reading. Lin is married to a former Marine and psychologist with 25 years of experience counseling ex- combat veterans. They reside in Nevada with their two dogs.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lincwilder?ref=hl

Twitter https://twitter.com/LinWilder

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/linwilder

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/linwilder

About Me https://about.me/lin.wilder

Amazon Author Page http://www.amazon.com/Dr.-Lin-Wilder/e/B007L380OM